ABOUT

Grieve Gillett Andersen is an award-winning multidisciplinary architecture, interior design, heritage and urban design practice based in Adelaide, South Australia.

 

Our work ranges from education and health facilities, public buildings and urban spaces, commercial, hospitality and retail developments and interiors, heritage conservation and adaptive reuse, transport and infrastructure, performing and visual arts venues, and residential projects, including new buildings, alterations & additions, infill and multiple residential projects.

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243 Pirie Street

Adelaide 5000 South Australia

Australia

 

Telephone

08 8232 3626

admin@ggand.com.au

 

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© 2019 Grieve Gillett Pty Ltd

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RAIL CAR DEPOT

PROJECT DETAILS

Client: DTEI

Location: Dry Creek, SA

Budget: $63 million

Completion: 2010

 

Team

Paul Gillett

David McLeod

Nicolette Di Lernia

Adam Sickerdich

Kym Barwell

Garth Davos

 

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DTEI Rail Car Depot 

Grieve Gillett Andersen was engaged by the Department of Transport, Energy and Infrastructure as lead design consultant to manage a multi-disciplinary consultant team responsible for briefing, design, documentation and delivery of the new Rail Car Depot.

 

The new facility, on a 1500m long and 500m wide site provides mechanical servicing and maintenance, washing and cleaning, refuelling and stabling for the entire metropolitan rail car fleet. The site also includes the suburban rail system control centre and staff and drivers amenities buildings. 

 

Simple and utilitarian in form, the finesse of the architecture is delivered in careful consideration of the facility’s functionality, accessibility, transparency, lighting and general detailing.

 

ESD initiatives to promote energy efficiency include insulated translucent skylights and wall lights coupled with sensor controlled switching and dimming systems, substantially improving internal lighting and reducing artificial lighting loads. Storm water is harvested and treated before release into the adjacent wetland system, which in turn feeds the subterranean aquifer.