ABOUT

Grieve Gillett Andersen is an award-winning multidisciplinary architecture, interior design, heritage and urban design practice based in Adelaide, South Australia.

 

Our work ranges from education and health facilities, public buildings and urban spaces, commercial, hospitality and retail developments and interiors, heritage conservation and adaptive reuse, transport and infrastructure, performing and visual arts venues, and residential projects, including new buildings, alterations & additions, infill and multiple residential projects.

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243 Pirie Street

Adelaide 5000 South Australia

Australia

 

Telephone

08 8232 3626

admin@ggand.com.au

 

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ELECTRANET RYMILL RECEPTION UPGRADE

PROJECT DETAILS

Client: ElectraNet

Location: Adelaide, SA

Completion: 2018

PROJECT TEAM

Paul Gillett

Emma Scott

Victoria Clarkson

Adam Sickerdich

Following a series of security events at their main reception area, lead ElectraNet to engaged Grieve Gillett Andersen to redesign the building entry, main reception, staff amenities breakout space, meeting rooms and lift to address equity of access requirements.

 

Located in the State heritage listed Rymill Building, the building had undergone a refit in 2003 which was rich in detail and embellishment. Initially identifying these newer works from original fabric was undertaken to ensure maintenance and integrity of the original build.

Through extensive consultation with ElectraNet's executive and reception staff to determine optimum functional and operational requirements of the reception and visitor registration, together with our security expertise we designed a safe, secure but appropriate barrier system. We consciously worked with ElectraNet executive and State Heritage Unit to balance the need for high security with a welcoming reception entry.

The restrained and understated materials palette of steel, glass and timber responded to the original heritage context but also aimed to sit subtly within a visibly cluttered double height volume. The result is a spatially complex, but visually simple insertion into the heritage fabric. The excellent security and circulation optimisation achieved by an appropriate contemporary insertion has been recognised in feedback from our clients and users.